'Any Day Now': It's Called Giving A Kid A Happy Home

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Any Day Now writer-director Travis Fine came across the story that would be his next film from a script that sat on the desk of original writer George Arthur Bloom and adapted it and tapped Alan Cumming to star in the story about a gay couple in the late '70s who fight a discriminatory legal system to formally adopt a special needs teen who has been in their care.

The feature, which opens Friday through Music Box Films, has won audience prizes at festivals throughout the year, including Tribeca where it debuted last Spring, to Provincetown, Chicago, Woodstock, Seattle and Outfest.

Inspired by a true story and touching on legal and social issues that are more relevant now than ever, Any Day Now tells a story of love, acceptance, and creating your own family. In the late 1970s, when Marco (Isaac Leyva), a teenager with down syndrome who’s been abandoned by his mother, is taken in by committed couple Rudy (Alan Cumming) and Paul (Garret Dillahunt), he finds in them the family he's never had.  However, when their unconventional living arrangement is discovered by the authorities, Rudy and Paul must fight a biased legal system to adopt the child they have come to love as their own.   Co-starring Frances Fisher, Gregg Henry and Chris Mulkey, Music Box Films will open the film in select theaters across the country on December 14.



Comments

  • Your headline--'Any Day Now': It's A Happy Home For A Kid Stupid-- is offensive. Isaac Leyva, the young man with Down syndrome who was one the stars of our film, was a rare talent, and a great joy to be around. His performance is one of the main reasons why we have been fortunate to win the Audience Award for Best Picture at nearly every film festival at which we have played. You should be ashamed of yourselves.

    • Brian Brooks says:

      The title was not in any way shape or form meant to be the way you interpreted it. It was intended to be a comment on the biases that left this couple to be in the situation for having to fight for the child they cared for and a play on a popular expression. However, point taken and there was a change.

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