To Catch a Thief Actually Being Remade by the Folks Who Brought You xXx and Piranha 3D

tocatchathief300.jpgSpeaking with Movie Hole, screenwriter Josh Stolberg (Piranha 3D, Good Luck Chuck) spilled the news that he and Bobby Florsheim have written Paramount's remake of To Catch a Thief, the 1955 Hitchcock romantic thriller starring Cary Grant as a cat burglar and Grace Kelly as the woman he falls for. The update, Stolberg enthuses, will be "more modern" and filled with gadgets -- and is being produced by Neal Moritz, the man behind such modern, gadget-filled flicks as xXx and the Fast and the Furious franchise.

"It's exciting because it's one of my favorite Hitchcock movies and it was fun to come at it from a different angle -- make it a little bit more modern and 'gadgety,'" Stolberg said. "It's the first script that I've ever written that [encompasses] a lot of heists and action sequences and... it was a blast!"

He continued: "We just turned in the script to the studio a couple of months ago and they're working on casting now. It takes place in Santorini. It's a travelogue of the most amazing places on Earth. It's gonna be a fun, fun ride I think."

(Stolberg also reveals that he and Florsheim have written a script entitled Man-Witch, with Todd Phillips attached as a producer and Zach Galifianakis possibly attached to star, about a male witch who "has to go to the witch training academy with a bunch of pre-pubescent little girls to learn how to control his powers before he destroys the world.")

Given the French Riviera backdrop, the romantic intrigue, and the heist element of the original film, To Catch a Thief could potentially duplicate for Paramount what the Ocean's 11 films did for Warner Bros. Back in 2004 when Moritz's remake was first announced, the story was going to take place in Miami -- 2 Fast 2 Furious, much? -- but Stolberg's reference to the Greek island of Santorini as a setting might be an indication that the filmmakers are leaning away from South Beach and more toward the old-world glamour and glitz of exotic European locales.

Still, it's hard to predict how Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief will translate under the guidance of Moritz, a producer better known for his action and genre work (I Am Legend, xXx, Fast and the Furious, Battle: Los Angeles, and the upcoming reboots of Total Recall and 21 Jump Street), than for his romantic-leaning films (Made of Honor, The Bounty Hunter). Plus, a director has yet to be named. But, perhaps more importantly: Which actors should be cast to fill Cary Grant and Grace Kelly's shoes in the remake? (No points for suggesting George Clooney. Too easy.)

· Stolberg talks To Catch a Thief remake, Man-Witch, Last Samurai [Movie Hole]



Comments

  • james says:

    you are guys are too late. april fools day was last friday. today is the 6th.

  • Dimitri says:

    Unfortunately, for Grace Kelly, this movie was a bomb. I believe that in her previous Hitchcock movie at that time, The Rear Window, she was knockout, drop dead because in real life, she was actually fond of Jimmy Stewart. I also believe that her Oscar for The Country Girl was actually in recognition of her incredibly boffo performance in The Rear Window. They're not telling you, but when The Rear Window was released, the lines into the movie theaters were wrapping around the city blocks.

  • cerealface says:

    ScarJo would be a great pick for the feisty role Frances Stevens! I think you gotta go with George Clooney for John Robie...(I know, I know - not that creative).

  • Vladimir says:

    I'm not sure where Dimitri gets his info, but "To Catch a Thief" was far from a bomb. It cost 2.5 million and made 8.75 million. By the way, its "Rear Window", not "THE Rear Window."

  • CiscoMan says:

    While the idea of remaking Hitchcock normally triggers that knee jerk the-world-is-ending reaction, To Catch a Thief is not among Hitch's best, in my opinion, and could use a good once over. Describing the script as "gadgety" scares me a little, though. Sure, heist remakes like Ocean's 11 and The Thomas Crown Affair had nifty, clockwork plotting, but they also had characters (and actors) with charisma. Hopefully, that's not lost on whoever they get to direct.

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